Knowles’ research, and her strong advocacy of new geographic approaches, have also helped revitalize a discipline that declined in the late 20th century as many leading universities closed their geography departments. “She’s a pioneer,” says Edward Muller, a histor- ical geographer at the University of Pittsburgh. “There’s an ingenuity in the way she uses spatial imagination to see things and ask questions that others haven’t.” Adds Peter Bol, a historian at Harvard and director of its Center for Geographic Analysis: “Anne thinks not just about new technology but how mapping can be applied across disciplines, to all aspects of human society.” (via Looking at the Battle of Gettysburg Through Robert E. Lee’s Eyes | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine)

Knowles’ research, and her strong advocacy of new geographic approaches, have also helped revitalize a discipline that declined in the late 20th century as many leading universities closed their geography departments. “She’s a pioneer,” says Edward Muller, a histor- ical geographer at the University of Pittsburgh. “There’s an ingenuity in the way she uses spatial imagination to see things and ask questions that others haven’t.” Adds Peter Bol, a historian at Harvard and director of its Center for Geographic Analysis: “Anne thinks not just about new technology but how mapping can be applied across disciplines, to all aspects of human society.” (via Looking at the Battle of Gettysburg Through Robert E. Lee’s Eyes | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine)

Geospatial information and technologies are crucial in the fight to better understand and manage ever more scarce water resources. The problem is especially critical to the future of many nations in the Middle East. This is the story of one project, supported by the World Bank, NASA and USAID to help implement and use advanced Water Information System Platform (WISP) tools and the underpinning data.
Read more…
(via Developing and Implementing Water Information System Platform (WISP) ToolsSDI Magazine)

Geospatial information and technologies are crucial in the fight to better understand and manage ever more scarce water resources. The problem is especially critical to the future of many nations in the Middle East. This is the story of one project, supported by the World Bank, NASA and USAID to help implement and use advanced Water Information System Platform (WISP) tools and the underpinning data.

Read more…

(via Developing and Implementing Water Information System Platform (WISP) ToolsSDI Magazine)

Everyone knows Andy Murray, the only man to win the Olympic gold and the US Open back-to-back. But what is he doing on a geospatial site?
It seems you can use spatial analysis to unravel patterns within a match that cannot be identified using traditional analysis and display techniques. 
See the Olympic Gold Medal match between Roger Federer and Andy Murray in an entirely new light: Using ArcGIS for sports analytics
(via Using ArcGIS for sports analytics | ArcGIS Resources)

Everyone knows Andy Murray, the only man to win the Olympic gold and the US Open back-to-back. But what is he doing on a geospatial site?

It seems you can use spatial analysis to unravel patterns within a match that cannot be identified using traditional analysis and display techniques. 

See the Olympic Gold Medal match between Roger Federer and Andy Murray in an entirely new light: Using ArcGIS for sports analytics

(via Using ArcGIS for sports analytics | ArcGIS Resources)

Visit the Ocean Health Index website for incredible visualizations an interactive map of ocean health!

The Ocean Health Index IS a valuable tool for the ongoing assessment of ocean health. By providing a means to advance comprehensive ocean policy and compare future progress, the Index can inform decisions about how to use or protect marine ecosystems.

The Index is a collaborative effort, made possible through contributions from more than 65 scientists/ocean experts and partnerships between organizations including the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Sea Around Us, Conservation International, National Geographic, and the New England Aquarium. (via News | Ocean Health Index)

The famous geographer Immanuel Kant maintained that geography was the study of knowledge in a location, while history was the study of knowledge in time. Since a map is a stationary object that’s meant to represent a physical location, it’s tempting to think that it wouldn’t allow you to display changes over time the way an animation or a graph would. So, if you have to compare information in a given place and over a period of time at the same time, how can you do it? (continue reading at: Time and GIS: Ways of Representing Time on a Map)

The famous geographer Immanuel Kant maintained that geography was the study of knowledge in a location, while history was the study of knowledge in time. Since a map is a stationary object that’s meant to represent a physical location, it’s tempting to think that it wouldn’t allow you to display changes over time the way an animation or a graph would. So, if you have to compare information in a given place and over a period of time at the same time, how can you do it? (continue reading at: Time and GIS: Ways of Representing Time on a Map)

Health & Wealth - The Potential and Challenge of Healthcare Data: Strata Conference - O'Reilly Conferences, October 01 - 02, 2012, London, England

Healthcare is one of the crunchiest areas to apply ‘big data’ to, and frequently identified as the sector with the greatest potential for transformation. The UK government Life Sciences Strategy announced in late 2011 placed particular emphasis on the use of patient data for research, and the opportunity for innovation.

Using Nesta research on the biomedical sector, and on the emerging need for a knowledge commons, we will use the example of healthcare and patient data to illustrate some critical barriers that remain to achieving the potential of big data in many sectors, not just health. Nesta is the UK’s innovation foundation, an independent charity that invests in research, networks and skills.

Few people still need convincing that data has potential to create massive value. But there are significant obstacles to overcome if we are to realise that value. It has to be about more than A/B testing and incremental improvements. How do we use data to innovate?

Alongside the challenge of innovation, we need to address how decision-makers make best use of the data in front of them. No-where is that challenge more stark than in patients making treatment decisions, with their doctor, based on data and evidence that is often inaccessible or poorly presented.

Nesta has this year commissioned research on the organisation of knowledge in the UK health system, and how digital platforms, open data and other innovations could make the knowledge more useful and accessible in real-time. We will be able to share our review of the health knowledge system as it currently stands, and our vision for how it should look in 20 years.

Continue reading this article here

Six Things You Should be Doing to Enhance Your GIS Career
GIS is not a static field and neither should your ongoing professional development be. With more and more academic institutions offering GIS certificate and degree-based programs, the competition in the field for GIS jobs is growing.
View the list here
(via Six Things You Should be Doing to Enhance Your GIS Career)

Six Things You Should be Doing to Enhance Your GIS Career

GIS is not a static field and neither should your ongoing professional development be. With more and more academic institutions offering GIS certificate and degree-based programs, the competition in the field for GIS jobs is growing.

View the list here

(via Six Things You Should be Doing to Enhance Your GIS Career)

Geospatial Visualization: Unleashing the Power of Location

Location-enabled data sets are pouring into organizations. Geospatial visualization allows companies to see what’s really going on among the rows and columns.

Geospatial visualization marries the broad insights available through visualization with specific types of analysis that can be performed on location-enabled data. Its power comes from an ability to zero in on key spatial relationships within large structured and unstructured data sets. Visualizing these relationships provides a useful way of organizing large volumes of data. More important, it can reveal fresh insights that would remain hidden without the interpretive combination of analytical integration and the human brain’s amazing ability to discern visual patterns.

Seeing is Believing

In the past, only a handful of industries—oil and gas, governmental agencies, and transportation and logistics—invested in using location as an organizing principle for advanced analysis. New tools and access to more geographically referenced data are now allowing the power of location to be unleashed across many more business areas and to a much broader base of users. New sources feeding the torrent of geospatial information include new structured data from mobile devices (e.g., phones, tablets, other GPS-assisted assets) and new streams of location-aware unstructured data (e.g., from Twitter, Facebook, Foursquare, and Flickr).

Geospatial visualization can enable the human mind to process and detect patterns hidden among huge volumes of information. Spatial analysis provides quantitative evaluation of complex relationships. Time-based animation and other forms of interactive visualization reveal long-term trends and subtle events. Real-time visualization can help drive better decisions on a daily or even hourly basis.

Perhaps most importantly, geospatial visualization’s familiarity and intuitiveness make it one of the most accessible manifestations of analytics. It provides both a compelling and widely usable form of insight derived from information automation and big data.

A case in point: A hardware company used geospatial visualization to understand why customer satisfaction levels had declined. It mapped customer sentiment against service center locations, traffic patterns, and competitor presence. The issue quickly became apparent. To save costs, the company had moved its customer service facilities away from downtown areas, which significantly increased the travel time for customers seeking support at the facilities. These customers were the source of negative feedback. To address their concerns, the company launched an education program on how to use its virtual support channels, initiated on-location services for a handful of large accounts, and simply acknowledged the issue with customers. This allowed the company to win back the good faith of many of its disgruntled customers.

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