How do you make education interesting and, more importantly, beautiful? When it comes to the work of NASA, attracting enthusiasts isn’t difficult with the usual visuals of bright stars and colorful planets on hand. Look no further than the recent awe over Mars rover Curiosity’s high-res pictures to see proof of humanity’s fascination with space.

But not all of NASA’s data is packaged into a neat little photos. In fact, some of the organization’s most important findings about space come back in the form of numbers, beamed in by one of the many satellites orbiting our planet. And this information is brought to life by the Scientific Visualization Studio (SVS) — a team of scientists and animators that turns numerical data into a dynamic graphic or video.

The SVS is not only an active and creative tool for NASA outreach — it has even gone viral. Earlier this year, the SVS team received information from a project team called Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, or ECCO, which uses mathematical tools to better understand how the ocean’s circulation patterns change over time. The result was Perpetual Ocean, a detailed and moving video interpreting a year’s worth of the ocean’s current patterns in minutes.

“I think scientists have an amazing internal world — they think about these things and how they work,” says Dr. Horace Mitchell, director of SVS. “But, they don’t do the kind of visuals that can be found in a feature film. That’s why we’ve found a niche that works.”

Continue reading this article here

(via How NASA Makes Scientific Data Beautiful)

Crisis teams will get a new eye on Earth this weekend. On July 21, an H-2B rocket will lift off from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan and head to the International Space Station. The rocket will carry the ISERV camera, to be mounted on the ISS to keep an eye on Earth from above. Designed as a joint venture project between SERVIR, USAID and NASA, this “Disaster Cam” will snap and transmit up to 7 high-resolution photographs per second, making it a critical asset for directing relief to remote regions. “Images captured from ISERV on the International Space Station will provide valuable information back here on Earth,” says Dan Irwin, SERVIR’s program director. “It will provide new data and information from space related to disasters, humanitarian crises and the increased effects of climate variability on human populations.” Julie Robinson, an ISS program scientist, adds that ISERV “reaffirms the station’s commitment to helping solve global issues.” (via New disaster cam to watch Earth from the ISS | canada.com)

Crisis teams will get a new eye on Earth this weekend. On July 21, an H-2B rocket will lift off from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan and head to the International Space Station. The rocket will carry the ISERV camera, to be mounted on the ISS to keep an eye on Earth from above. Designed as a joint venture project between SERVIR, USAID and NASA, this “Disaster Cam” will snap and transmit up to 7 high-resolution photographs per second, making it a critical asset for directing relief to remote regions. “Images captured from ISERV on the International Space Station will provide valuable information back here on Earth,” says Dan Irwin, SERVIR’s program director. “It will provide new data and information from space related to disasters, humanitarian crises and the increased effects of climate variability on human populations.” Julie Robinson, an ISS program scientist, adds that ISERV “reaffirms the station’s commitment to helping solve global issues.” (via New disaster cam to watch Earth from the ISS | canada.com)

Little Blue Marble Blown into Being by a Master Glassblower!
You would have seen the famous “Blue Marble” fully illuminated Earth, as the Apollo astronauts saw on December 7, 1972; 
Here is Blue Marble 2012, an incredible new image of the Earth, taken by the recently launched Earth-observing satellite, Suomi NPP, on January 4. You can download the high-res (8,000 x 8,000 pixels!) image (16.4 MB) from this link

Little Blue Marble Blown into Being by a Master Glassblower!

You would have seen the famous “Blue Marble” fully illuminated Earth, as the Apollo astronauts saw on December 7, 1972; 

Here is Blue Marble 2012, an incredible new image of the Earth, taken by the recently launched Earth-observing satellite, Suomi NPP, on January 4. You can download the high-res (8,000 x 8,000 pixels!) image (16.4 MB) from this link