A sensor that digitally maps the area through which the wearer is moving, in real time, has been created by scientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
(via BBC News - Wearable sensor maps disaster areas in real time)

A sensor that digitally maps the area through which the wearer is moving, in real time, has been created by scientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

(via BBC News - Wearable sensor maps disaster areas in real time)

Crisis teams will get a new eye on Earth this weekend. On July 21, an H-2B rocket will lift off from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan and head to the International Space Station. The rocket will carry the ISERV camera, to be mounted on the ISS to keep an eye on Earth from above. Designed as a joint venture project between SERVIR, USAID and NASA, this “Disaster Cam” will snap and transmit up to 7 high-resolution photographs per second, making it a critical asset for directing relief to remote regions. “Images captured from ISERV on the International Space Station will provide valuable information back here on Earth,” says Dan Irwin, SERVIR’s program director. “It will provide new data and information from space related to disasters, humanitarian crises and the increased effects of climate variability on human populations.” Julie Robinson, an ISS program scientist, adds that ISERV “reaffirms the station’s commitment to helping solve global issues.” (via New disaster cam to watch Earth from the ISS | canada.com)

Crisis teams will get a new eye on Earth this weekend. On July 21, an H-2B rocket will lift off from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan and head to the International Space Station. The rocket will carry the ISERV camera, to be mounted on the ISS to keep an eye on Earth from above. Designed as a joint venture project between SERVIR, USAID and NASA, this “Disaster Cam” will snap and transmit up to 7 high-resolution photographs per second, making it a critical asset for directing relief to remote regions. “Images captured from ISERV on the International Space Station will provide valuable information back here on Earth,” says Dan Irwin, SERVIR’s program director. “It will provide new data and information from space related to disasters, humanitarian crises and the increased effects of climate variability on human populations.” Julie Robinson, an ISS program scientist, adds that ISERV “reaffirms the station’s commitment to helping solve global issues.” (via New disaster cam to watch Earth from the ISS | canada.com)